Are You At Risk Of Being Declared A Habitual Offender?

In South Carolina, if you accumulate three or more "major" violations over a five-year period, you are declared a habitual offender and lose your driver's license for no less than seven years. While this consequence is bad, there is limited mass transportation in this area, meaning that such a suspension can be absolutely devastating for the offender's personal or professional life. It may, however, be possible under certain circumstances to get a provisional license back within two years.

To make matters worse, you can also go to prison for five years, and infractions as small as failing to pay a traffic ticket can be considered a habitual offender violation. It is also important to note that there are multiple steps needed to defend against a habitual offender charge, including an administrative part and a legal part. Each aspect of the process is nuanced and contextual, and it requires an expert approach from an experienced lawyer if you want to do everything possible to work toward an ideal outcome.

Your Livelihood Could Be On The Line

We understand the hardships that a habitual offender charge can put on a personal or professional life. As such, we are committed to bring the vigorous criminal defense approach we have used for more than a quarter century to ensure that you do not get pushed around. Our approach works to give you the greatest chance of keeping your license. We encourage you to reach out as soon as possible to begin working toward a best-possible resolution.

To discuss any license suspension issue in a free initial consultation with a Clemson habitual offender defense attorney, call 864-551-4370 or email us.