Know what to do if your child is abducted

There are many former couples in South Carolina who do not see eye to eye. However, most do their best to get along for the benefit of their children. They may not agree with each other's decisions, but it is easy to assume that each believes they have the child's best interests at heart. However, for some parents the custody arrangement does not work out the way they hope. They find themselves unable to spend the amount of time they wish with their children.

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What are grandparents' rights to visitation?

When the parents of a child go their separate ways in South Carolina, it can be a difficult time for all concerned. Custody needs to be decided and visitation arrangements must be made for the non-custodial parent. Generally, the best interests of the child are kept at the heart of all this and steps are taken to ensure that the child receives as much access to each parent as possible.

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Not having physical custody does not mean you get no say

Child custody battles can be difficult things to go through. In general, most parents simply want the best for their children and to be as much a part of their lives as possible. However, as many parents in South Carolina have learned, when couples separate, this often means that neither parent is able to spend as much time with their child as they did before. Even so, this does not mean that the child has any less of a happy upbringing.

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Mother arrested over custody interference

Child custody decisions can often be difficult for parents in South Carolina to accept. No matter what terms you are on with your child's other parent, the chances are that you would still like to be as much a part of your child's life as possible. Unfortunately, in order to ensure that children are able to spend time with each parent, assuming they are deemed suitable, child custody orders generally restrict the amount of time each parent gets with their child.

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Establishing father's rights as an unmarried father

Both biological parents have the right to pursue child custody and child visitation, regardless of whether they were ever married. Married fathers, or once married fathers, do not automatically have a better claim to child custody rights compared to unmarried fathers. Rather, the court operates under the assumption that the child benefits more when both parents are involved in his or her life.

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When do courts use a child's wishes to help determine custody?

Child custody cases can be difficult to go through. Parents often get emotional and children may be traumatized by the constant bickering they may see between their parents, which makes the situation stressful for all parties involved. If parents disagree, the courts will step in and make a decision about child custody for them and will use a number of factors to do so. In some cases, they even let the child weigh in on the case.

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Parents should work together to resolve custody disputes

One of the most difficult things for parents to deal with when getting divorced is child custody. When relationships come to an end, and there are children involved, there is a chance that parents will disagree about how they will handle child custody. Even though they have the option to work together to figure out an arrangement, some parents choose to battle it out in court and let the judge decide for them.

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Factors to consider in divorce and child custody

Going through a divorce is never easy, especially when there are children involved. There are many factors to consider such as who stays in the matrimonial home and how to divide assets. However, the most important decision to be made is who will maintain custody of the children, or if there is to be joint custody, how long and when will they stay with each parent. 

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Determining where a child will live when parents divorce

When a South Carolina couple has a child, they may split parenting duties especially if one ends up working more than the other. If the couple decides to get a divorce later on, however, the parent who was primarily responsible for the child's care may be considered to be the primary caretaker. This can potentially influence where the child will live once the divorce is finalized.

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